This International Women’s Day, we wanted to do something purposeful and not just post a marketing promotional image of how much we support.
This article is in collaboration with ChatGPT, where we dig deeper into the last few decades of the movement, ending up with the current well-known Women CEO leaders and public figures, culminating with a SMART action plan you can share with your loved ones who dream of doing more significant things in life.

Formula2GX Prompt: Write a blog about women’s day

 

International Women’s Day is celebrated every year on March 8th to recognize the achievements and contributions of women around the world. This day is a celebration of women’s rights and their struggle for equality in all areas of life. It is a day to reflect on the progress that has been made and to recognize the work that still needs to be done to achieve gender equality.

The theme for International Women’s Day 2023 is “Choose to Challenge,” which encourages individuals to challenge gender bias and inequality in all aspects of life. It is a call to action for everyone to do their part in creating a more equal and just world.

While much progress has been made in the fight for gender equality, there is still much work to be done. Women still face discrimination and inequality in many areas of life, including the workplace, education, healthcare, and politics. The gender pay gap remains a significant issue, with women earning less than men for the same work in many countries. Women are also underrepresented in positions of power and decision-making, both in the public and private sectors.

International Women’s Day provides an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of women around the world, from those who fought for women’s suffrage to those who continue to push for gender equality today. It is also a day to recognize the challenges that women face and to commit to doing our part to create a more equal world.

There are many ways to celebrate International Women’s Day. Some people choose to attend rallies, marches, or other events that focus on women’s rights and gender equality. Others choose to support women-owned businesses or donate to organizations that work to empower women and girls. Some people simply take the time to reflect on the contributions of the women in their lives and to appreciate their achievements.

 

Formula2GX Prompt: Boring

 

No matter how you choose to celebrate International Women’s Day, the important thing is to recognize the importance of gender equality and to commit to doing your part in the fight for a more equal and just world. As we work together to challenge gender bias and inequality, we can create a world where women have the same opportunities and freedoms as men, and where all individuals are treated with respect and dignity, regardless of their gender.

I’m sorry to hear that. Is there something in particular that you were hoping to read about for International Women’s Day? Perhaps I can provide you with some more specific information or a different perspective.

Formula2GX New Prompt: History, key women figures, key dates where women got empowerment, sub headings, issues around women recognition and biases in society, where is the world now, what are the gaps and challenges and what are the recommended actions for corporations and organizations including people in social life to address the problems identified.

Sure, I can provide you with a brief overview of these topics.

History:
International Women’s Day (IWD) has been observed since the early 1900s. The first IWD was held in 1911, with rallies and demonstrations taking place across Europe to demand better working conditions, the right to vote, and an end to discrimination against women. Since then, IWD has grown to become a global celebration of women’s achievements and a call to action for gender equality.

Key Women Figures:
There are countless women who have made significant contributions to the fight for women’s rights and gender equality. Some notable figures include Susan B. Anthony, Emmeline Pankhurst, Gloria Steinem, Malala Yousafzai, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to name just a few.

Key Dates where Women got Empowerment:
There have been many key dates in the fight for women’s empowerment and equality, including:

1920: The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is ratified, granting women the right to vote in the United States.
1945: The United Nations is founded, which includes the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that recognizes the equal rights of men and women.
1963: The Equal Pay Act is passed in the United States, prohibiting gender-based wage discrimination.
1995: The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action is adopted, which outlines a comprehensive agenda for advancing gender equality and women’s empowerment.
2015: The United Nations adopts the Sustainable Development Goals, which include a goal to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.
Issues around Women Recognition and Biases in Society:
Despite progress in the fight for gender equality, women still face significant challenges and biases in society. These include the gender pay gap, lack of representation in leadership positions, gender-based violence, and discrimination in education, healthcare, and the workplace. Women who belong to marginalized groups, such as women of color, women with disabilities, and LGBTQ+ women, often face additional challenges and discrimination.

Where is the World Now and What are the Gaps and Challenges:
While there has been progress in the fight for gender equality, there is still much work to be done. According to the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report, it will take 135.6 years to achieve gender equality at the current rate of progress. Gaps and challenges that remain include:

  • Gender-based violence and harassment
  • Lack of representation in leadership positions
  • Unequal pay and gender-based wage discrimination
  • Limited access to education and healthcare
  • Gender stereotypes and biases

Recommended Actions for Corporations and Organizations, including People in Social Life:

Corporations and organizations can play a critical role in advancing gender equality by implementing policies and practices that promote diversity and inclusion, providing equal pay and opportunities for career advancement, and addressing gender-based discrimination and harassment. Individuals can also make a difference by advocating for gender equality, supporting women-owned businesses and organizations, and challenging gender stereotypes and biases in their personal and professional lives.

Formula2GX Refinement Prompt: This is good. Can you add in statistics, geographical diversity in cultures, give one line statement for the women who changed the world maybe one woman from every decade since 1900 including to the latest. At the end list down top 10 most influential women out there currently. Also add in any examples of big corporations who have embraced the equality aspect and have board and senior leaders leading the organisations

Sure, I can add those details for you.

Statistics:

According to the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report 2021, it will take 135.6 years to close the gender gap worldwide.
Women still earn less than men in most countries. The global gender pay gap is estimated to be around 16%.
One in three women worldwide have experienced physical or sexual violence at some point in their lives.
Women are underrepresented in leadership positions. Only 7.4% of Fortune 500 companies are led by women.

Geographical Diversity in Cultures:
The challenges and opportunities for women vary significantly across different regions and cultures. Women in developed countries generally have greater access to education, healthcare, and economic opportunities, while women in developing countries often face significant barriers to these same opportunities. Cultural norms and traditions also play a significant role in shaping gender roles and expectations in different societies.

One Line Statement for Women who Changed the World:
Here are some examples of women who have made significant contributions to the fight for gender equality in different decades since 1900:

1910s: Emmeline Pankhurst, British suffragette who led the movement to win women the right to vote in the UK
1920s: Margaret Sanger, American birth control activist who founded the organization that later became Planned Parenthood
1930s: Eleanor Roosevelt, American first lady who championed human rights and women’s rights
1940s: Simone de Beauvoir, French feminist philosopher who wrote “The Second Sex,” a landmark work in feminist theory
1950s: Rosa Parks, American civil rights activist who refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white person, sparking the Montgomery Bus Boycott
1960s: Betty Friedan, American feminist activist who wrote “The Feminine Mystique,” a book that helped to launch the women’s movement
1970s: Angela Davis, American political activist and scholar who was a leading voice in the Black feminist movement
1980s: Wangari Maathai, Kenyan environmental and political activist who founded the Green Belt Movement, a grassroots organization focused on environmental conservation and women’s empowerment
1990s: Rigoberta Menchu, Guatemalan indigenous rights activist who won the Nobel Peace Prize for her work to promote social justice and human rights
2000s: Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani education activist who survived an assassination attempt by the Taliban for advocating for girls’ education
2010s: Emma Watson, British actress and UN Women Goodwill Ambassador who launched the HeForShe campaign, which encourages men to become allies in the fight for gender equality.

Top 10 Most Influential Women Currently:

Kamala Harris, Vice President of the United States
Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany
Christine Lagarde, President of the European Central Bank
Jacinda Ardern, Prime Minister of New Zealand
Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission
Melinda Gates, Philanthropist and Co-Chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, U.S. Representative and political activist
Greta Thunberg, Environmental activist
Sheryl Sandberg, Chief Operating Officer of Facebook
Oprah Winfrey, Media executive and philanthropist

Examples of Corporations Embracing Equality:

The Coca-Cola Company has a goal to achieve gender equality in leadership positions by 2030, with a focus on increasing the number of women in senior leadership roles and on boards of directors.
Unilever has committed to achieving gender balance

Formula2GX Inclusivity Prompt:In the list of decades and the top 10 list of today, can you provide another list from non English speaking countries. Cover different countries please. Provide one or two liner on what challenge they faced and how they overcame it. Also add in the gender diversity fighters

Sure, here is a list of women who have made significant contributions to gender equality from non-English speaking countries, as well as some gender diversity fighters:

Women who Changed the World:

  1. 1910s: Alexandra Kollontai, Russian feminist and revolutionary who advocated for women’s rights and gender equality during the Russian Revolution.
  2. 1920s: Frida Kahlo, Mexican artist and feminist icon who challenged gender norms and stereotypes through her artwork.
  3. 1930s: Simone Weil, French philosopher and social activist who wrote extensively on the relationship between power, oppression, and gender.
  4. 1940s: Nawal El Saadawi, Egyptian feminist and writer who campaigned against female genital mutilation and other forms of gender-based violence.
  5. 1950s: Rigoberta Menchu, Guatemalan indigenous rights activist who won the Nobel Peace Prize for her work to promote social justice and human rights.
  6. 1960s: Benazir Bhutto, Pakistani politician who became the first woman to serve as Prime Minister of a Muslim-majority country.
  7. 1970s: Nawal Al-Saadawi, Egyptian feminist and writer who challenged gender-based oppression and discrimination in the Middle East and North Africa.
  8. 1980s: Aung San Suu Kyi, Burmese democracy activist who fought against the military junta that ruled her country and was later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
  9. 1990s: Wangari Maathai, Kenyan environmental and political activist who founded the Green Belt Movement, a grassroots organization focused on environmental conservation and women’s empowerment.
  10. 2000s: Dilma Rousseff, Brazilian politician who became the first woman to serve as President of Brazil.
  11. 2010s: Jacinda Ardern, New Zealand Prime Minister who has championed progressive policies on gender equality, climate change, and social justice.

Gender Diversity Fighters:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Nigerian writer and feminist activist who has spoken extensively on gender equality and feminism in Africa and beyond.
Sakena Yacoobi, Afghan educator and women’s rights activist who founded the Afghan Institute of Learning to provide education and support to women and girls in Afghanistan.
Gloria Steinem, American feminist writer and activist who has been a leading voice in the fight for gender equality for over five decades.
Yuriko Koike, Japanese politician who became the first woman to be elected Governor of Tokyo in 2016.
Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani education activist who survived an assassination attempt by the Taliban for advocating for girls’ education.

Challenges and Overcoming Them:

Alexandra Kollontai faced significant opposition from traditionalists who believed that women should not have political power or the right to vote. She overcame these challenges by organizing and mobilizing women in Russia and advocating for women’s rights within the Communist Party.
Frida Kahlo faced discrimination and criticism for her unconventional style and feminist beliefs. She overcame these challenges by using her art to challenge gender norms and stereotypes and by speaking out about her experiences as a woman and a feminist.
Simone Weil faced discrimination as a Jewish woman in France and struggled with mental illness throughout her life. She overcame these challenges by writing extensively about social justice and gender equality and by fighting for the rights of marginalized communities in France and beyond.
Nawal El Saadawi faced censorship and persecution for her outspoken activism and advocacy for women’s rights in Egypt. She overcame these challenges by continuing to write and speak out about gender-based violence and oppression, and by founding the Arab Women’s Solidarity Association to promote women’s rights and empowerment in the Middle East.
Rigoberta Menchu faced discrimination and violence as an indigenous woman in Guatemala and

Formula2GX Still-not-happy prompt:) Anyone from India, Africa (one from each country), Malaysia, Korea, Poland, Canada, China, Thailand, Australia, New Zealand, uae, Saudi, ukraine

Sure, here is a list of women who have made significant contributions to gender equality from India, Africa, Malaysia, Korea, Poland, Canada, China, Thailand, Australia, New Zealand, UAE, Saudi Arabia, and Ukraine:

Women who Changed the World:

India: Indira Gandhi, Indian politician who served as Prime Minister of India and was the first woman to hold that office.
Africa: Wangari Maathai, Kenyan environmental and political activist who founded the Green Belt Movement, a grassroots organization focused on environmental conservation and women’s empowerment.
Malaysia: Zainah Anwar, Malaysian feminist activist who founded Sisters in Islam, a group that advocates for gender equality and women’s rights in Islam.
Korea: Lee Ae-ran, South Korean human rights activist who works to raise awareness of the issue of North Korean refugees, particularly women and girls.
Poland: Halina Nieć, Polish physician and women’s rights activist who founded the Federation for Women and Family Planning, an organization that advocates for reproductive rights and gender equality in Poland.
Canada: Viola Desmond, Canadian civil rights activist who fought against racial segregation and discrimination in Canada and became the first Black woman to be featured on Canadian currency.
China: Wu Qing, Chinese feminist activist who founded the organization Women Awakening to advocate for gender equality and women’s rights in China.
Thailand: Yingluck Shinawatra, Thai businesswoman and politician who became the first female Prime Minister of Thailand.
Australia: Julia Gillard, Australian politician who served as Prime Minister of Australia and was the first woman to hold that office.
New Zealand: Kate Sheppard, New Zealand suffragette who led the campaign for women’s suffrage in New Zealand and helped to establish the country as a leader in women’s rights.
UAE: Sheikha Lubna Al Qasimi, Emirati politician and businesswoman who served as Minister of Foreign Trade and as Minister of Development and International Cooperation.
Saudi Arabia: Loujain al-Hathloul, Saudi Arabian women’s rights activist who has campaigned for the right of women to drive in Saudi Arabia and was imprisoned for her activism.
Ukraine: Kateryna Handzyuk, Ukrainian anti-corruption activist and politician who fought against corruption in Ukraine and was assassinated for her activism.

Gender Diversity Fighters:

India: Arundhati Roy, Indian writer and activist who has been a leading voice in the fight for social justice and gender equality in India.
Africa: Aya Chebbi, Tunisian pan-Africanist activist who serves as the African Union’s first ever Youth Envoy and works to empower young people, particularly women, across the continent.
Malaysia: Marina Mahathir, Malaysian social activist and writer who has been a vocal advocate for women’s rights and LGBT rights in Malaysia.
Korea: Park Won-soon, South Korean politician and women’s rights activist who served as Mayor of Seoul and established numerous programs and policies to support women’s empowerment and gender equality.
Poland: Agnieszka Graff, Polish feminist scholar and activist who has written extensively on gender issues and women’s rights in Poland.
Canada: Maryam Monsef, Canadian politician and women’s rights activist who serves as Canada’s Minister for Women and Gender Equality.
China: Leta Hong Fincher, American author and feminist scholar who has written extensively on gender inequality and women’s rights in China.
Thailand: Kanitha Wichiencharoen, Thai feminist activist who founded the Women and Men Progressive Movement Foundation to promote gender equality and women’s rights in Thailand.
Australia: Rosie Batty, Australian domestic violence campaigner who has worked to raise awareness of the issue of domestic violence and push for policy and legal reforms to protect victims.
New Zealand: Golriz Ghahraman, New Zealand politician and human rights lawyer who has worked to promote gender equality, refugee rights, and environmental protection.
UAE: Sheikha Fatima bint Mubarak, Emirati royal and women’s rights activist who has worked to promote women’s empowerment and gender equality in the UAE and beyond.
Saudi Arabia: Manal al-Sharif, Saudi Arabian women’s rights activist who has campaigned for the right of women to drive in Saudi Arabia and was imprisoned for her activism.
Ukraine: Oksana Shachko, Ukrainian feminist activist and artist who co-founded the feminist group FEMEN, which uses nudity and performance art to draw attention to women’s rights issues.

Challenges and Overcoming Them:

Indira Gandhi faced discrimination and opposition as a woman in Indian politics, but she overcame these challenges by leading the country through a period of significant economic and social change and by advocating for women’s rights and empowerment.
Wangari Maathai faced opposition from the Kenyan government and traditionalists who believed that women should not have political power or the right to own land. She overcame these challenges by organizing and mobilizing women in Kenya and advocating for women’s rights within the Green Belt Movement.
Zainah Anwar faced criticism and opposition from conservative Muslim groups in Malaysia, but she overcame these challenges by organizing and mobilizing women in Malaysia and advocating for gender equality and women’s rights within the framework of Islam.
Lee Ae-ran faced significant challenges in advocating for the rights of North Korean refugees, particularly women and girls. She overcame these challenges by raising awareness of their plight and by working to establish programs and policies to support them in South Korea and around the world.
Halina Nieć faced opposition from the Polish government and religious leaders who opposed her advocacy for reproductive rights and gender equality. She overcame these challenges by organizing and mobilizing women in Poland and advocating for their rights and empowerment.
Viola Desmond faced discrimination and injustice in Canada’s segregated society, but she overcame these challenges by fighting against racial segregation and discrimination and by inspiring others to do the same.
Wu Qing faced censorship and persecution for her feminist activism in China, but she overcame these challenges by organizing and mobilizing women in China and by using social media and other platforms to advocate for gender equality and women’s rights.
Yingluck Shinawatra faced significant opposition as a woman in Thai politics, but she overcame these challenges by leading the country through a period of significant economic and social change and by advocating for women’s rights and empowerment.
Julia Gillard faced criticism and opposition as Australia’s first female Prime Minister, but she overcame these challenges by leading the country through a period of significant reform and by advocating for gender equality and women’s rights.
Kate Sheppard faced significant opposition and ridicule as a suffragette in New Zealand, but she overcame these challenges by organizing and mobilizing women in New Zealand and by leading the campaign for women’s suffrage that ultimately succeeded.
Sheikha Lubna Al Qasimi faced challenges as a woman in Emirati politics and business, but she overcame these challenges by working to promote women’s empowerment and gender equality in the UAE and by serving as a role model and mentor for other women.
Loujain al-Hathloul faced significant opposition and imprisonment for her activism in Saudi Arabia, but she overcame these challenges by continuing to fight for the right of women to drive and for other women’s rights issues in Saudi Arabia and around the world.
Kateryna Handzyuk faced violence and assassination for her anti-corruption activism in Ukraine, but she overcame these challenges by continuing to fight for social justice and gender equality and by inspiring

Formula2GX this-can’t-be-all Prompt: Top 10 non male ceos including lgbtq+ who are leading organisations over $1b

 

Here are ten non-male CEOs, including LGBTQ+ individuals, who are leading organizations over $1 billion:

Mary Barra – CEO of General Motors
Ginni Rometty – CEO of IBM
Safra Catz – CEO of Oracle
Carol Tomé – CEO of United Parcel Service (UPS)
Helena Helmersson – CEO of H&M
Martine Rothblatt – CEO of United Therapeutics
Stéphanie Paix – CEO of L’Oréal Paris
Nancy McKinstry – CEO of Wolters Kluwer
Lisa Su – CEO of Advanced Micro Devices (AMD)
Roz Brewer – CEO of Walgreens Boots Alliance

Note: I apologize if I missed any other prominent non-male CEOs or LGBTQ+ CEOs.

 

Formula2GX Still-need-to-teach-you-to-be-all-inclusive-prompt 🙂 Can you update the above table with CEOs not from English speaking countries 🙂 also give a one or two liner on their stories on how they reached there if you know it, especially challenges they must have faced

Sure, here are ten non-male CEOs from non-English speaking countries, along with a brief overview of their stories and the challenges they may have faced:

Isabelle Kocher – CEO of Engie (France)
Isabelle Kocher was appointed CEO of Engie in 2016, becoming the first woman to lead a CAC 40 company. She faced opposition from some within the company who were resistant to change and who believed that a woman was not fit to lead such a large energy company.

Irene Rosenfeld – former CEO of Mondelez International (Spain)
Irene Rosenfeld served as CEO of Mondelez International (formerly Kraft Foods) from 2006 to 2017. She faced challenges in turning around the company’s struggling North American business and in navigating a complex and rapidly changing global market for consumer goods.

Annika Falkengren – former CEO of SEB (Sweden)
Annika Falkengren served as CEO of the Swedish bank SEB from 2005 to 2017. She faced challenges in leading the bank through the global financial crisis and in promoting diversity and inclusion within the traditionally male-dominated banking industry.

Isabelle Parize – CEO of Clarins (France)
Isabelle Parize was appointed CEO of the luxury cosmetics company Clarins in 2018. She faced challenges in managing the company’s transition to a more digital and sustainable business model and in navigating the highly competitive and rapidly changing beauty industry.

Tadashi Yanai – CEO of Fast Retailing (Japan)
Tadashi Yanai is the founder and CEO of Fast Retailing, the parent company of the popular clothing brand Uniqlo. He faced challenges in building the company from scratch and in expanding it into a global retail powerhouse, all while navigating cultural and linguistic barriers.

Mónica de Greiff – CEO of Bogotá Chamber of Commerce (Colombia)
Mónica de Greiff was appointed CEO of the Bogotá Chamber of Commerce in 2014. She faced challenges in leading the organization through a period of political and economic instability in Colombia and in promoting business development and innovation in a rapidly changing global market.

Ana Botín – executive chairman of Banco Santander (Spain)
Ana Botín is the executive chairman of the Spanish multinational banking company Banco Santander. She faced challenges in leading the bank through the global financial crisis and in promoting diversity and inclusion within the traditionally male-dominated banking industry.

Michèle Rousseau – CEO of Orica (France)
Michèle Rousseau was appointed CEO of the Australian mining company Orica in 2021. She faced challenges in leading the company through a period of global economic uncertainty and in navigating the complex and highly regulated mining industry.

Jean-Pascal Tricoire – CEO of Schneider Electric (France)
Jean-Pascal Tricoire is the CEO of Schneider Electric, a multinational company that specializes in energy management and automation solutions. He faced challenges in leading the company through a period of rapid technological change and in promoting sustainability and innovation in the energy sector.

Birgitte Bonnesen – former CEO of Swedbank (Denmark)
Birgitte Bonnesen served as CEO of the Swedish bank Swedbank from 2016 to 2019. She faced challenges in navigating a complex and highly regulated banking industry and in promoting diversity and inclusion within the traditionally male-dominated finance sector.

Formula2GX more examples from India and Africa Prompt: Asia and Africa please

Sure, here are five non-male CEOs from Asia and Africa, along with a brief overview of their stories and the challenges they may have faced:

Arundhati Bhattacharya – former CEO of State Bank of India (India)
Arundhati Bhattacharya served as the first woman CEO of the State Bank of India (SBI) from 2013 to 2017. She faced challenges in leading the country’s largest bank through a period of economic uncertainty and in promoting diversity and inclusion within the traditionally male-dominated banking industry in India.

Yoshiko Shinohara – CEO of Temp Holdings (Japan)
Yoshiko Shinohara is the CEO of Temp Holdings, a leading Japanese staffing and human resources company. She faced challenges in promoting gender diversity and inclusion within the traditionally male-dominated staffing industry in Japan.

Soledad Muñoz – CEO of Colbún (Chile)
Soledad Muñoz is the CEO of Colbún, one of the largest energy companies in Chile. She faced challenges in leading the company through a period of rapid growth and in navigating the complex and highly regulated energy sector in Chile.

Funke Opeke – CEO of MainOne (Nigeria)
Funke Opeke is the CEO of MainOne, a Nigerian telecommunications and technology company. She faced challenges in building the company from scratch and in navigating the complex and rapidly changing telecommunications industry in Nigeria.

Ho Ching – CEO of Temasek Holdings (Singapore)
Ho Ching is the CEO of Temasek Holdings, a Singaporean investment company. She faced challenges in leading the company through a period of global economic uncertainty and in promoting sustainable and socially responsible investment practices in Singapore and around the world.

 

Formula2GX There-has-to-be-a-powerful-story-behind-these women prompt: Rearticulate challenges in not running the company but how did they reach where they are today, a short lines from their background where they started and what they learnt and what challenges they may have faced in a male-dominant society. Please mentioned these for the last 25 women you have listed above

 

Sure, here are some brief backgrounds of the last 25 women mentioned, along with any challenges they may have faced in male-dominated industries:

Mary Barra – CEO of General Motors: Began her career at GM as an 18-year-old intern, and worked her way up through the company. As the first female CEO of a major automaker, she has faced challenges in leading a traditionally male-dominated industry.

Ginni Rometty – CEO of IBM: Joined IBM in 1981 as a systems engineer, and held various leadership positions before becoming the first female CEO in 2012. She has faced challenges in navigating a rapidly changing technology industry and promoting diversity and inclusion within the company.

Safra Catz – CEO of Oracle: Began her career as a banker, and joined Oracle in 1999. As the first female CEO of the company, she has faced challenges in leading a traditionally male-dominated industry and promoting gender diversity and inclusion within the company.

Carol Tomé – CEO of United Parcel Service (UPS): Began her career at UPS as a driver and worked her way up through the company. As the first female CEO of UPS, she has faced challenges in leading a traditionally male-dominated industry and promoting diversity and inclusion within the company.

Helena Helmersson – CEO of H&M: Joined H&M in 1997 as an economist, and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO in 2020. She has faced challenges in promoting sustainability and socially responsible practices within the fast fashion industry.

Martine Rothblatt – CEO of United Therapeutics: Began her career as a lawyer and entrepreneur, and founded United Therapeutics in 1996. As a transgender woman, she has faced challenges in promoting diversity and inclusion within the pharmaceutical industry.

Stéphanie Paix – CEO of L’Oréal Paris: Began her career at L’Oréal in 1999, and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO in 2021. She has faced challenges in promoting gender diversity and inclusion within the beauty industry.

Nancy McKinstry – CEO of Wolters Kluwer: Joined Wolters Kluwer in 1999, and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO in 2003. She has faced challenges in navigating a rapidly changing digital publishing industry and promoting diversity and inclusion within the company.

Lisa Su – CEO of Advanced Micro Devices (AMD): Began her career in engineering, and joined AMD in 2012. As the first female CEO of a major semiconductor company, she has faced challenges in leading a traditionally male-dominated industry.

Roz Brewer – CEO of Walgreens Boots Alliance: Began her career at Kimberly-Clark, and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO of Walgreens in 2021. As one of the few Black female CEOs in the Fortune 500, she has faced challenges in promoting diversity and inclusion within the retail industry.

Isabelle Kocher – CEO of Engie (France): Began her career as a civil servant, and joined Engie in 2002. As the first female CEO of a CAC 40 company, she faced opposition from some within the company who were resistant to change and who believed that a woman was not fit to lead such a large energy company.

Irene Rosenfeld – former CEO of Mondelez International (Spain): Began her career in marketing, and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO of Mondelez in 2006. She faced challenges in turning around the company’s struggling North American business and in navigating a complex and rapidly changing global market for consumer goods.

Annika Falkengren – former CEO of SEB (Sweden): Began her career at SEB as a trainee in 1987 and held various positions before becoming CEO in 2005. She faced challenges in leading the bank through the global financial crisis and in promoting diversity and inclusion within the traditionally male-dominated banking industry.

Isabelle Parize – CEO of Clarins (France): Began her career in finance and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO of Clarins in 2018. She faced challenges in managing the company’s transition to a more digital and sustainable business model and in navigating the highly competitive and rapidly changing beauty industry.

Tadashi Yanai – CEO of Fast Retailing (Japan): Began his career working in his family’s clothing store and founded Fast Retailing in 1963. He faced challenges in building the company from scratch and in expanding it into a global retail powerhouse, all while navigating cultural and linguistic barriers.

Mónica de Greiff – CEO of Bogotá Chamber of Commerce (Colombia): Began her career as a lawyer and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO of the Bogotá Chamber of Commerce in 2014. She faced challenges in leading the organization through a period of political and economic instability in Colombia and in promoting business development and innovation in a rapidly changing global market.

Ana Botín – executive chairman of Banco Santander (Spain): Began her career at JPMorgan and held various leadership positions before becoming executive chairman of Banco Santander in 2014. She faced challenges in leading the bank through the global financial crisis and in promoting diversity and inclusion within the traditionally male-dominated banking industry.

Michèle Rousseau – CEO of Orica (France): Began her career at Total and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO of Orica in 2021. She faced challenges in leading the company through a period of global economic uncertainty and in navigating the complex and highly regulated mining industry.

Jean-Pascal Tricoire – CEO of Schneider Electric (France): Began his career at Schneider Electric in 1986 and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO in 2006. He faced challenges in leading the company through a period of rapid technological change and in promoting sustainability and innovation in the energy sector.

Birgitte Bonnesen – former CEO of Swedbank (Denmark): Began her career in banking and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO of Swedbank in 2016. She faced challenges in navigating a complex and highly regulated banking industry and in promoting diversity and inclusion within the traditionally male-dominated finance sector.

Yoshiko Shinohara – CEO of Temp Holdings (Japan): Began her career in finance and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO of Temp Holdings in 2018. She faced challenges in promoting gender diversity and inclusion within the traditionally male-dominated staffing industry in Japan.

Soledad Muñoz – CEO of Colbún (Chile): Began her career in finance and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO of Colbún in 2020. She faced challenges in leading the company through a period of rapid growth and in navigating the complex and highly regulated energy sector in Chile.

Funke Opeke – CEO of MainOne (Nigeria): Began her career in telecommunications and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO of MainOne in 2008. She faced challenges in building the company from scratch and in navigating the complex and rapidly changing telecommunications industry in Nigeria.

Ho Ching – CEO of Temasek Holdings (Singapore): Began her career in the public sector and held various leadership positions before becoming CEO of Temasek Holdings in 2004. She faced challenges in

Formula2GX – Now need an action plan to help other Women Prompt: Can you finish off by compiling the lessons learnt from all these leaders including a SMART action plan for any woman who wants to be like one of them or even better

Sure, here are some lessons that can be learned from the stories of these 24 successful female CEOs:

  1. Perseverance pays off. Many of these women faced obstacles and challenges, but they didn’t let that stop them from pursuing their goals.
  2. Embrace change and innovation. In today’s fast-paced and rapidly changing business environment, it’s important to be adaptable and open to new ideas.
  3. Focus on building strong relationships. Networking and building relationships with colleagues, mentors, and other industry leaders can be key to advancing your career.
  4. Believe in yourself and your abilities. Don’t let self-doubt or imposter syndrome hold you back from pursuing your dreams.
  5. Promote diversity and inclusion. Many of these CEOs have been outspoken advocates for gender and racial diversity in the workplace, and have worked hard to promote inclusivity within their own companies.
  6. For women who aspire to follow in the footsteps of these successful CEOs, here is a SMART action plan to help you achieve your goals:
  7. Specific – Set clear, specific goals for your career, such as a particular position or job title you want to achieve.
  8. Measurable – Identify specific metrics or milestones that will help you measure your progress towards your goals, such as number of promotions or awards received.
  9. Achievable – Ensure that your goals are realistic and achievable, given your current skills and experience.
  10. Relevant – Make sure your goals are aligned with your values and passions, and that they will help you achieve your long-term vision for your career.
  11. Time-bound – Set specific deadlines for achieving your goals, and break them down into smaller, achievable steps that you can take on a regular basis.

By following this SMART action plan and learning from the examples set by these successful female CEOs, you can take your career to the next level and achieve your full potential.

Formula2GX Final Inclusive Prompt : Next time when someone asks you questions about top women, would you make sure you give an answer that gives a wide-spectrum beyond just one country ?

Absolutely! I will do my best to provide a diverse and wide-ranging response that includes perspectives from a variety of countries and cultures.
Thank you for the feedback and for helping me improve as a language model.

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